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on "morning joe" -- former national security adviser dr. brzezinski. hardball's chris mathews, dan senor back on the show, and actor john o'hurley will be here with two special guests to preview thursday's popular national dog show. up next, mike allen with this morning's politico playbook. but first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> good wednesday pomonk to you. busy travel day. the last thing we needed was a large area of the country with heavy fog. i expect significant problems in the midwest. the northeast, clouds are moving out, just like yesterday in many areas. no travel concerns whatsoever for all of the busy i-95 cities. airports are off to a good start and they should remain that way during the day. of course be there can be some volume issues because of so many people. that's about it. nice forecast and the winds should remain light. your flight should be a relatively uneventful flight in the eastern seaboard. to the problem area, areas of gray, dense fog advisories all fwrats the springfield joplin area through st. louis back through chicago, indianapolis, all through
houdini." and the ever-reliable dan balz, who is back with more tealz of army special agent john fuller for his 25th novel "the forgotten." gillian, i want to start with you. just a masterpiece of writing, your book. i don't want to give away too much of it. so i'll let you tell us. but it is the story-- it is a thriller but it's told in a very unusual way, and basically, it's about trust in a marge that sort of went wrong. >> it's about nick and amy dunn. they're a married couple, and amy goes missing on her five-year anniversary, and it starts with that very basic premise, but the story is told as kind of a he said/she said sort of story. so it's told from nick's point of view, on the day she goes missing and as he quickly starts to become a person of interest, we don't know where amy is and what happened to her. and through amy, through diary entries from the first days of their courtship to the days she's missing, and we come to quickly understand these two not entirely reliable narrator, and you're going to have to sift through and decide who to believe. >> schieffer: that was the
paper in san diego talking about dan mckennon and it says navy pilot, radio and airline executive, appointed to two federal boards and son of san diego congressman. those are a lot of things but dan was so much more than all of those even put together. first, his father was a democrat congressman from san diego here in the 1950's. probably stood at this table like i am speaking now. dan was a page when we still had pages in the house in the 1950's during the truman administration as well. he had a great respect and love for this country and he had a great respect and love for this body and the institution. he has some great claims to fame. one of those is this -- as a young man, dan served in the navy as a helicopter pilot and he's credited with 62 saves on land or sea. that's more saves during peace time than any other navy pilot in history. he loved the navy and loved flying and that led him to other things in life. he was a great pilot. he was inspired to fly from some words taken from the movie "the bridge over toko" and i will summarize what made him want to be a helicopter p
? why then, dan, are we feeling this way? you share the view that we are not -- you're not done with the fiscal cliff. we're not going to suddenly solve our fiscal problems. we certainly haven't been talking enough on the spending side. there seems to be movement toward the idea that some people's taxes will go up at the high end. middle class won't see much of a tax increase. why the optimism? are we justified? >> well, i think the typical consumer is not like you and me and our other guests here. the typical median income is $60,000 a year for a family. they're not getting a lot of money from capital gains and dividends. they're not freaked out at the prospect of those going up. they're concerned about what is in their paycheck. paychecks are morsteady than they had been any time the last few years. wages are going up a little bit. the biggest asset that anybody owns is a house. we finally seem -- it's not just the value of sales rising and construction but home values. and so with every passing week, you know, certain number of people underwater on their mortgages are now in
bring the parties one step closer. >> want to bring in our white house correspondent dan lothian. hi, dan. good to see you. >> how are you? >> over the weekend it was like watching an alternate universe. you have republicans jumping ship and reversing themselves on a pledge thafts very strong. i mean, grover norquist saying there's no tax pledge. here's a little bit about what we got. a taste of this weekend. listen. >> times have changed significantly, and i care more about this country than i do about a 20-year-old pledge. i think we owe the debt, and we to figure out a way to pay it. >> i agree entirely with saxby chambliss. a pledge you signed 18 years ago is for that congress. if i were in congress in 1841, would i have signed a declaration of war against japan. the wourld has changed, and the economic situation is different. >>> there's a lot that has been said about this pledge, and i will tell you when i go to the constituents that have re-elected me, it is not about that pledge. it really is about trying to solve problems. >> all right, dan. you got all these republicans who
problems for the country, maybe even a crisis. brings us to dan lothian at the white house this morning. dan, good morning. senate goes back to work this afternoon. the house will return tomorrow. what could really be done by lame duck congress? >> well, look, the hope is that there will be some kind of compromise here, because as you pointed out most americans believe that if there is no agreement there really could be a crisis here. so you are seeing some softening from republicans who took that no tax pledge back to 1986. first it was saxby chambliss. now south carolina republican senator lindsey graham. take a listen. >> when you're $16 trillion in debt, the only pledge we should be making to each other is to avoid the coming grief, and republicans, republicans should put revenue on the table, we're this far in debt, we don't generate enough revenue. i want to buy down debt and cut rates to create jobs. but i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country, only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >> and i think that's important what he said there. only i
in this recovery. >> then, dan, are we feeling this way? you share the view that we are not -- we're not done with the fiscal cliff. we're not going to suddenly solve our fiscal problems. we certainly haven't been talking it up on the spending side. we've agreed -- we haven't agreed but there seems to be a movement toward the idea that some taxes will go up on the high end and the middle class won't see much of a tax increase. are we justified? >> i think the typical consumer is not like you and me and the other guests there. the typical consumer makes about $60,000 a year for their family. they're not getting tax dividends so they're not freaked up about those going up. they're concerned about their paychecks and paychecks have been more steady for the first time in several years, wages have gone up a little bit, and the biggest asset people own is a house. it's not just a volume of sales rising and construction but home values. and so with every passing week, a certain number of people who are under water on their mortgages are now in positive territory. and that contributes to what we call
up there cadillac an ev. why make all of this vernlgts you talk with dan ackerson says emphatically evs are the future for this industry, maybe not this year, maybe not next year but down the road, why they continue to invest in electric cars. thank you very much, phil lebeau in los angeles for us today. so, what do you think of the electric car? go to finance.yahoo!.com results coming up later on "power lunch." >>> we are watching facebook. the last two weeks, 10%, 25% the past two months. people thinking facebook has turned a corner. julia boorstin is in los angeles with details on that. hi, julia. >> hi, sue. even with some new privacy concerns, things are definitely look up for the social network and the stock is holding on to the gains the last two months. two of wall street's most bearish analysts have turned to bulls, bernstein and btig upgrading the stock in expectation of a surge in mobile ad revenue, facebook has to walk a delicate line. more ads good for the bottom line but could turn off users. facebook survived the biggest lockup explorations without a flood of selling.
phenomenon is the growing sense how can they feel victimized? there is a man named dan who was an activist investor. becoming the ceo of yahoo! but december 2010 he said to be mailed to his friends and the subject heading was battered wives. to except the and abuse of president obama the email says written in the voice of a battered wife he really loves us when he hit the seed is not needed and most of the time the bruises do not show. seriously. another man named tj rogers investor of a semiconductor company said he feels the victim and -- victimization of the super turk -- super rich is so extreme they are like the depressed ethnic minority. the president should be ashamed to treat them this way because he knows what it is like. truth. for the hitler analogy? it is just commonplace. with a carried interest is a particular benefit famously comparing himself to invading poland and then as part of getting my book out there which by the way there are so many parallels with the rise of barack obama and hitler. he said i did not mean to compare them but there are a lot of parallels. it is very
, was this an atomic bomb? dan kim the line, how long until we can make money? is hardly the response of somebody looking for a way to surrender. truman intended to show japan that he would use any weapon at our disposal. there was no atomic diplomacy. he wanted to show the japanese it was surrender or die. became a temporary victory the principles of american exceptionalism worldwide. unlike all previous empires commit the u.s. is unwilling to dominate the free world delete previous pictures had. the postwar world asked if america fisheries resources unreservedly, restrain itself economically and rebuild her former friends and enemies enthusiastically. this in turn would produce well in western europe. all provided by the protection of the american military. that will suddenly share would in turn provoked the very institutions and disciplines needed to maintain, let alone expand freedom and prosperity for others. i want to mention for a moment the role of the soviet union in world war ii and take this on as a challenge to prevailing wisdom. after 1942 the red army overwhelmed the and men insane.
his hands on twinkies. he purchased more than 25 packs. >> i don't think (inaudible). >> for dan the small business owner the price is unbeatable. he said his business depended on the marine awe factory. >> adds a small business we depend on this. >> today's sale is literally bitter sweet. her husband worked at the marina factory for over 2 decades. >> it is sad that a few greedy people decided a pay cut wasn't good enough and wanted 100 percent pay cut. they affected 18,000 employees. >> for those who lost employment to those who will see the iconic dessert banished from the store shelves make sure you get your hands on the popular brand supplies are only expect to do last through the end of this week. >> 19 minutes after the hour. we have this to tell you about. end of the year quickly approaching. >> parents paying police now to tail teenagers as they get behind the wheel. is that a good idea? we report, you decide. [ male announcer ] this is steve. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba diving the great barrier reef with sharks, or jumping into the market, he
on private equity. it's an issue we have not talked about yet. joining us now is dan primac of "fortune" magazine. >> good morning. >> so fiscal cliff, does it really matter to the world of private equity? >> it matters to the extent of if we go off of it or run into it depending on your metaphor. everyone feels we go into immediate recession, shock recession. it obviously matters because private equity succeeds or fails based on the portfolio companies in a major recession. private equity's a long-term asset class, it can survive as an industry or asset class. cycles better than most can. in general, i think everyone's kind of optimistic, believes something will get done. but there's nobody hoarding money or freaking out yet. >> what about carried interest? we keep talking about taxes and that's one component of this debate. carried interest sort of went on the table, then went off the table, maybe it comes back on the table. but it's not something we're hearing a lot about now. where do you think that issue stands? >> you know, for a long time, i've thought that the issue just works g
off today with gains across the board. dan greenhouse, chief global strategist joins us. i know you're a fan of history. is the santa claus rally a real thing or just an urban legend? >> it's a real thing. >> buy stocks now and sell them new year's eve. >> lots of sayings on wall street tend to be not accurate. the concept of santa claus rally is one of the few that are true. modest outperformance from christmas to january 1st, january 2nd. stock traders almanac would define it first two days of the year as well. you see this year after year. the question for investors this year is whether or not the fiscal cliff gets in the way. in the context of what's happening with black friday, it's a really interest question. think the answer is yes. it does get in the way. >> we never had a fiscal cliff before. >> we're talking about black friday. black friday isn't the holiday shopping season. dana was on cnbc all morning. i'm sure she would agree. most shopping occurring as you get closer to christmas and then maybe saturday or sunday before is the peak. >> no one will make up to the perils
to the upside. >> of course, dan, everyone has said if there's this idea that washington can come together and define some sort of solution, that will make the markets buy into this confidence in washington. washington has big problems, and the solutions are probably going to mean painful medicine around. is there a moment when the markets wake up and realize and say, oh, my gosh, we have to realize we are talking about spending cuts, higher taxes and combination of these two things could lead to some troubling times for the markets too? >> well, that's going to be found out once the deal is in. let's say they had some sort of a deal and you start breaking it down. you'll have to look at how is it going to impact the economy? i imagine they're going to do it to minimize whatever impact there is. it seems to me, there's growth in this economy and we're looking for a place to spring board from it. so they're not going to want to ruin that chance. but until the details are out, we're really not going to want to know. >> we have not talked fiscal cliff with you in-depth on these things. what i
of what moral envision as dan pointed out in his chapter in the book he had edited commemorating the passage of the morel act that we're celebrating the 150th anniversary this year, and say his vision was for liberal education as well as toll tal yaren and as the american research university e americaed from the classical -- and the science and technology certainly science and technology draws more federal support, but without the humanities and -- there is just absolutely extraordinary work being done in the humanities which informs our intellectual culture, it's pervasive, i think it's just not as -- it doesn't produce the breakthrough technology as you said that the nano technology cousin. >> do the panelists think that the humanities are getting the short end of the stick. are they just jealous of the new buildings for the engineering college? >> i think that there's no question they feel downtrodden. in reality, if you look at the fundamental purpose of the university education, although we have the vocational focus right now sometimes said that the purpose of the college ed
. >> there are just five weeks until the fiscal cliff takes place. agricultural secretary dan goodman talks about efforts in congress to create a bipartisan agreement. from washington journal this is 40 minutes. >> is right after an election the best time to heed calls on citizenship. ? more ground be gained? >> well, think the president hass more choices. the public gave president obama a clear victory. congress is divide although the democrats picked up some seats in both places. if elections have consequences, wouven the consequences is the public has spoken. it's up to the legislative body and the president to work together like the fis cliff and the deficit. there's no better time to get a kick in the rear ends than after an election. >> you wrote a brees the democrats and the republicans agree. you looked at area where is you see agreement. as we head into this lame duck session and look at system of the big economic things on the table, do you see places that there are an agreement? >> you think we can easily win agreement. the issue of taxes and deficits and spending cuts. i mean, you've
weeks. the state of florida is on the low end. host: this was updated november 2of 2012. welcome, dan. you're on the air. caller: good morning. this is another extension of the entitlement society. we would not have to have this continued discussion about how long people have been on unemployment. it is more of the entitlement society. i believe that romney cost himself the election by making comment.n i think 30% of the country thinks they should be able to sit around and not do anything. what has the president done? passing nationalized health care. everybody who has a brain in their head understands nationalize health care has not worked in europe and canada and it will not work here in the united states. guest: i take issue with a couple of points. this is an entitlement society. i am glad my mother was able to get social security and medicare. she earned it and she got it. i'm sure the seniors feel they paid into the system and the earned it. payments are made into the system based on work that individuals do. when they lose their jobs, they get this insurance. they get what they
of everyday and i have a fixed format. maybe they are on an iphone or dan android pc. you want to give each person the best possible handful of pieces of content for them at that time. that is a growing problem. it is during free quickly and we believe it is important to solve. there is a bunch of machine learning, a bunch of infrastructure to assemble for each person. one thing i think about this is your publishing for each of $1 billion ever met. in needs to stab today. there is a model that tries to project is most likely to get air active with optimizing -- news feed optimizes what they would like to interact with. what will create a consumer of between the publisher and consumer? that is the high level. >> you think about how that system works for. lettis positive feedback. you'll get more of that thing. how do you tweak the algorithms so people ill don't show up -- it is a personalized newspaper. how do you now the difference between how they interact. people want to have both interactive, one more often but they want to see the other one and check it out occasionally. >> the main thi
itself and jim brown, the nfl legendary, the legendary nfl running back was on the panel and dan garza, professor at stanford who has worked on mouthguard technology that can measure the force of impacts on the head and kevin turner who was the subject of documentary which you will see a clip of it called american man produced by a colleague of mine who works at hbo. so, this panel will be featured in a show on the world channel on november 20 at 8:00 p.m. and on line as well. pbs is working with, public television is working with the aspen institute to turn this into a one-hour session. there will be a whole one-hour session which will include conversations about football safety but we are going to play about a ten-minute clip of that. [no audio] [inaudible conversations] let's come back to it. sorry about that. so what i would like to do now is start off this conversation about the under 14 question, the pre-high school equation and i would like to do that with our special guest, dr. robert cantu who many of you will of course are familiar with. he is the chief of neurosurgery and ch
in the air. people were still uncomfortable about walter having stepped down and dan rather stepping in. i think there was competition and jealousy, and the. i think on walter's part there was some regret. he he was such an icon even in his own day. what made me excited was that, through all of that, the cuure of storytelling and reporting did not change at all. in some ways, it gradually did start to change at cbs. but, for me, i could not believe it. i felt like these people were so professional. i was scared to death. that is a good thing, i think, that you feel like you have a lot of experience and you have done a lot of reporting and producing and you understand television news, but you are surrounded people who are really good and challenge you. i love that. i felt like i was able to learn some of the more traditional values you will at thechool that started in our building. i will talk about those a little bit as we go. hi also got very fortunate because i ended up overseas within about three years. .ased in london i recommend it highly for students. think about an international ass
running back was on the panel and dan garza, professor at stanford who has worked on mouthguard technology that can measure the force of impacts on the head and kevin turner who was the subject of documentary which you will see a clip of it called american man produced by a colleague of mine who works at hbo. so, this panel will be featured in a show on the world channel on november 20 at 8:00 p.m. and on line as well. pbs is working with, public television is working with the aspen institute to turn this into a one-hour session. there will be a whole one-hour session which will include conversations about football safety but we are going to play about a ten-minute clip of that. [no audio] [inaudible conversations] let's come back to it. sorry about that. so what i would like to do now is start off this conversation about the under 14 question, the pre-high school equation and i would like to do that with our special guest, dr. robert cantu who many of you will of course are familiar with. he is the chief of neurosurgery and chairman of the department of surgery and drifter of services of
legal in the country. this is about 50 minutes. >> dan has written a wonderful book but it you have not seen the exhibit downstairs, i think he will be impressed with what has been put together in celebration of the prohibition and anti prohibition movement. it is exciting to talk about prohibition for the reason that the election has put the question of anti prohibition before us all over again. in addition to the ballot initiative in colorado and washington, we have medical use approved in massachusetts and two new announcements in rhode island and maine that legislations will take up the question of decriminilization of marijuana for recreational use. the question of the day is one i will offer today which is what lessons can we draw from prohibition for today's issue? >> the first one we know that prohibition was a terrible failure. despite the best of intentions, there were good reasons for prohibition. the efforts did not succeed. the comparison i make is to prostitution. every society since the dawn has tried to outlaw prostitution and no one has succeeded. it is part of a wo
to thank my colleague, dan rothschild here who helped bring this all together. he's had an interest in this issue for a long time, as have i and it's timely and important that we start talking about these things. there's been a tension at the heart of the conservative movement's approach to immigration for at least as long as i've followed politics and a lot longer than that. there are two influential camps that have jockeyed to define the right approach to immigration policy. this will be accrued generalization, but i believe a fair one. on the one hand there are economic libertarians. they don't mind so much the presence of large numbers of immigrants here in the united states illegally. and they would also welcome much more legal immigration as well. we can call this the "wall street journal" wing. on the other hand there's social and law and order conservatives, who are concerned about preserving america's unique culture and the maintenance of social order. to these conservatives the presence of large numbers of people in the united states and in violation of american law is inh
this question -- why does dan lungren want me to die? as did a 19-year-old. who indicated that he had suffered some paralysis from an accident. as did a 40-year-old woman, approximately, for some disease she had. stunning. stunning. only thing i could see on the other side of the philosophical divide would be someone who is an army vet, having been paralyzed, sitting in a wheelchair, looking in -- at the camera, saying about a member who had voted against a defense bill, why do you want me to die? why do you want me to be in a wheelchair? in either case the civility is out the window. the ability to talk about an issue that is underlying it is last -- is lost. in the example i gave, the question would be was an appropriate level of funding for defense, were there certain problems with the defense bill? not do you want this veteran to die? in the case that i cited in which i was the subject of that ad, the issue was embreeon exstem cell research. embryonic stem cell research. not the question of what is the ethical thing to do in a very difficult circumstance. former president george w. bush ha
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)